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Tag: Sire Records
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Tag: "Sire Records"

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Delta Rae Dish On Influences, Videos, And OurStage Success

OurStage band Delta Rae have come a long way since opening for Hanson as the winners of the “Shout It Out with HANSON” Competition in 2010. Not that Delta Rae were unskilled amateurs back then – Isaac Hanson said that his band should have been opening for them insteadbut since nabbing that gig, Delta Rae signed a major label deal with Sire Records, were booked to play at this year’s Democratic National Convention, and were featured in the Rolling Stone “Women Who Rock” Competition. Not bad for just two years. We recently caught up with the band to talk about their recent activity, their inventive music videos, and how opening up for Hanson boosted their burgeoning career.

Delta Rae ‘Carry The Fire’ With New Album Release

Delta Rae has been making big moves recently. Scratch that. Huge moves. After inking a deal with Sire Records, the Durham, NC six-piece are ready to bring their harmony-heavy Americana sound to the masses. They’ll be releasing their debut album Carry the Fire on Tuesday, June 19. If you can’t wait until then, you can stream the record in its entirety over at Rolling Stone.

As if that weren’t enough for an up-and-coming band, Delta Rae also recently covered Fleetwood Mac’s classic “The Chain” for Billboard’s “Under Cover” program and will be performing at the Grammy Museum in Los Angeles the Monday night before their album release. That show will kick off a packed summer of national tour dates for the group. Phew. We’re getting tired just writing about all they’re up to. Go Delta Rae.

History Of Punk

Like all great historical movements, punk rock’s timeline extends back further than its universally accepted starting date of 1977. Antecedents like the early Stooges and MC5 albums suggested, as far back as 1969, the dwindling peace-and-love influence of the hippies on popular culture, and indirectly voiced the rumblings of discontent of a disillusioned generation.

Teenagers of the ‘70s started to resent the bloated excess of classic rock and the slick materialism of the disco scene. Although small musical fires were being set all over the world simultaneously, one of punk’s ground zeros was the shabby rock club CBGB on New York City’s then-dicey (now mostly gentrified) Bowery. The sartorial outrageousness and garage-y musical grit of The New York Dolls, and later the rough and tumble, untutored appeal of The Ramones, Voidoids, Patti Smith, Blondie and other stars of the CBGB scene turned designer/clothing shop-owner Malcolm McLaren’s head, later to resurface as influences on the band McLaren managed, The Sex Pistols. Indeed the CB’s scene, given wings by the 1976 release of the first Ramones album on Sire Records, made a big impact in the UK amongst unemployed, disaffected teenagers of the underclass, who immediately adopted (and adapted) the do-it-yourself aesthetic to express their own dissatisfaction with their decaying empire, bad economy and hopeless-seeming future.

By 1977, The Clash, The Subway Sect, The Buzzcocks, Siouxsie & the Banshees, X-Ray Spex, The Slits and many more bands were all making important, yet musically diverse, contributions to the punk canon. Other punk scenes flourished in Ireland (The Undertones) and Australia (The Saints, Radio Birdman) and punk became well-represented all over Europe and North America.

At the turn of the ‘80s, punk had splintered into a variety of styles, including hardcore (especially popular on the West Coast of the US), new wave, synth-pop and post-punk. Hybrids and offshoots evolved, like two-tone ska, cowpunk, psychobilly, garage-punk and surf-punk. Metal began to reemerge as an influence, and many bands added metallic elements, to varying degrees, to the punk template. A more melodic and perhaps song-oriented strain of punk emerged toward the end of the decade, giving rise to what became known as alternative rock, and later indie rock. The Seattle punk scene gave birth to grunge, and grunge’s posterboys, Nirvana, became one of the best-loved bands of the era.

The success of Nirvana and other alternative acts changed the music industry in the ‘90s. Punk was more widely accepted than ever before.  By mid-decade, radio and MTV were playing the hell out of pop punk bands like Green Day and Jimmy Eat World. As punk became more and more mainstream and commercial, teenagers and other creative folks continued to find ways to reclaim the sound and attitude for their own—Riot Grrls, twee pop, emo, screamo, post-hardcore, dance punk and an endless variety of other subgenres have materialized, all fueled by the same passionate need to rebel, to communicate and, ultimately, to rock.

Paula Carino

Paula Carino is a musician and writer based in New York. She’s written for AMG, American Songwriter and contributed to the Encyclopedia of Pop Music. She’s also a yoga teacher and authored the book “Yoga To Go.”

Punk On The Rocks: Against Me! “White Crosses”

On June 8th, Florida’s Against Me! released their fifth studio album and second full length on Sire Records, White Crosses. So far, the release has been met with mixed reception by fans. What do I think? White Crosses is a solid album. In fact, the first three songs —”White Crosses,” “I Was A Teenage Anarchist” and “Because Of The Shame”— totally kick ass. The problem? It doesn’t sound like Against Me!, or at least it doesn’t sound like the Against Me! that first caught my attention.

To be honest, I haven’t been keeping up with Against Me! all that much since I last saw them in 2004. Maybe I was more shell shocked than most by the monster guitars and clean, processed vocals that met me when I popped White Crosses into my CD player instead of the folk-punk sound of their previous releases. Which isn’t to say that I didn’t enjoy the record. “We’re Breaking Up” is a straight ahead rock song about growing apart and the end of a relationship, and “Because Of The Shame” is a real standout—a touching track about the grief and surreality of attending an ex’s funeral. I just couldn’t shake the feeling “This is great! What band is this again?”

But who are the fans to say what a band should sound like? Against Me! themselves sum it up best in the Crosses cut “I Was A Teenage Anarchist: “Do you remember when you were young and you wanted to set the world on fire?” Against Me! wrote “Baby, I’m An Anarchist” almost 10 years ago. To expect someone to be the same person they were 10 years ago is ridiculous. To expect musicians to  make the same music they made 10 years ago is even more so. As you get older, you lose some of the fire of youth. Ideals change, friendships fade, lovers leave, people die. Fans either have to accept that Against Me! has chosen to go in a different direction with their music and embrace it, or move on. After all, demanding someone conform to your personal taste standards is so not punk.

White Crosses is available in record stores worldwide and as a deluxe version on iTunes. Against Me! will be touring the US (with Silversun Pickups) and Europe all summer.

 


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