Video Playback Error

The Adobe Flash Player is required to watch videos on this page

Tag: "new orleans"

home buzz rock pop urban country

Five Entertainment Alternatives For Super Bowl Sunday

If you’re among the many who cringe at the thought of partaking in any Super Bowl Sunday festivities, fear not. Just because you don’t want to paint your face the color of your favorite team, wear your favorite player’s jersey, or spend the day jumping up and down screaming in joy (or anguish) doesn’t mean you can’t have a good time this weekend. In fact, with most people preoccupied by the game, there’s a lot to do with no crowds to deal with, and since you probably have no obligations, might as well take advantage. We’ve put together a list of five entertainment alternatives for those wishing to sit out the “big day” this Sunday. Check them out after the jump. Continue reading ‘Five Entertainment Alternatives For Super Bowl Sunday’

Exclusive Q and A: G-Eazy Talks Tour, Tunes, and Time Travel

OurStage Exclusive InterviewsImagine an alternate reality where rock ‘n’ roll and hip-hop come of age simultaneously, and greasers blast fat beats from vintage car stereos on their way to the sock hop. This is the world of G-Eazy, a New Orleans-bred emcee and producer whose been on a precipitous rise to the top of the rap game for the past few years.  After a string of mixtape releases culminating with The Endless Summer, which demonstrated his pitch-perfect blend of doo-wop and hip-hop, G is poised to take over the national scene. He’s opened for Lil Wayne and A$AP Rocky, and is currently one of the few hip-hop artists on the Vans Warped Tour. We recently caught up with G about the tour, his upcoming album, and what he’d really do with a trip back in time.

OS: You’re playing on every date of the Vans Warped Tour this summer.  What has it been like so far as a hip-hop artist on a mostly punk tour?

G: Well, it totally feels like I’m an outsider, but it’s all working out just fine. I think that having Mod Sun and T. Mills playing the same stage that I’m playing helps a lot because we have a lot of crossover fans that we share. But other that that it’s been fun. It’s been interesting being the outsider and not always fitting in, but there are a ton of cool people here and a ton of cool bands. It’s not really my scene and I wasn’t even into this as a kid, so it’s definitely strange, but it’s really awesome in its own way. There’s a lot of fans here that straight up look like actors from a Tim Burton movie.

OS: But you’re also kind of an out-of-the-box hip-hop artist yourself, with the ’60s doo-wop vibe that you bring to your tracks.  What if you could go actually back to the era that you emulate in your music?  Which artist would you want to collaborate with?

G: The obvious answer would be The Beatles, but that’s not really a possibility. I feel like they wouldn’t collaborate with anybody. They were kind of in their own world.  But if it would be possible to squeeze into one of their sessions and find a way to work with John Lennon, that would be really unbelievable. Also, I mean, if I could go back in time and I could get Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers to the studio and have them lay parts down, I think that would be kind of awesome.

Continue reading ‘Exclusive Q and A: G-Eazy Talks Tour, Tunes, and Time Travel’

Search For The Coldest Semi-Finalists Announced – Vote Now For Your Favorite And Win Killer Prizes

The Coors Light® “Search For the Coldest” Competition is about to kick things up a notch. Are you ready? The many have been whittled down to the few—it’s time to meet the round four Semi-Finalists.

The following eight Semi-Finalists from the New Orleans, New York, National Video, and National Wildcard channels will continue to battle it out for your votes online at searchforthecoldest.com until July 10.

New Orleans

Boy Sykes

DL.

Continue reading ‘Search For The Coldest Semi-Finalists Announced – Vote Now For Your Favorite And Win Killer Prizes’

Judge And Rank The Coldest MC’s For A Chance To Win Incredible Prizes From Coors Light

Do you know amazing hip hop when you hear it? Want to put your talents to good use and score some sweet prizes? Good, we’ve got just the thing. Judge in the Coors Light® “Search For The Coldest” Competition between April 1 and July 10, and you’re eligible to win daily prizes including G-Tech DJ Backpacks with built-in speakers, Jambox speakers by Jawbone and official Coors Light SFTC 2012 t-shirts. In addition, you could be one of four fans to win BIG.

Two winners will get a trip for two to the Essence Music Festival in New Orleans, LA from July 6-8, including airfare and hotel accommodations for three nights, two tickets for the Festival and a $300 gift card. Two additional winners will receive a trip for two to the Search for the Coldest Finale in New York City on July 26, 2012, including airfare and hotel accommodations for two nights, two tickets to attend the Search For the Coldest Finale and a $300 gift card.

Head to searchforthecoldest.com to get started.

Fans: Help Search For The Coldest MC And Win Amazing Prizes!

OurStage has teamed up with Coors Light to search for “The Coldest” MC in music and we need your help!

Judge the Coors Light® “Search for the Coldest” Competition to help select the nation’s “Coldest” MC, and you could take home one of many sweepstakes prizes. Two Grand Prize winners will receive a trip to Essence Music Festival, while two more will have the opportunity to attend the competition finale in New York City hosted by Ice Cube. Also, we’re giving away daily prize packs, including backpacks with built-in speakers, Coors mugs, Jambox speakers and t-shirts!

Judging is open until May 25th, so get on it now and lock down your shot to win some awesome prizes from Coors!

 

Let The Search For The Coldest Begin…

For the second year in a row, OurStage and Coors Light are teaming up to find the coldest MC in the game. Think you have what it takes? Then the Coors Light® “Search for the Coldest” Competition is for you.

All solo hip hop artists (that are at least twenty-one years old) are encouraged to enter their best original track into the Coors Light® “Search for the Coldest” Competition Channels (New Orleans, New York, National Wildcard, Video, Atlanta, Baltimore, Charlotte or Philadelphia). Eight semi-finalists will be chosen by the OurStage fans and the competition judges to perform in New York City at a finale hosted by Ice Cube, with one Grand Prize Winner going home with their song featured on Coors Light® “Search For The Coldest” mixtape, as well as a track produced by DJ Drama, and $10,000 worth of studio time. If you want a shot at this awesome opportunity, enter your best original track by May 15, 2012.

 

Exclusive Q&A: MuteMath Revive Their Creativity

OurStage Exclusive InterviewsAfter a rough recording experience with 2009′s Armistice, New Orleans rockers MuteMath decided to reclaim creative control. The result is Odd Soul, a back-to-basics, bluesy record that speaks to the band’s live strengths, first and foremost. The album inspired the band’s upcoming Odd Soul Tour, which features breakthrough 3D video technology on top of stellar performances from both MuteMath and opening act Canon Blue. OurStage caught up with drummer Darren King to talk about how the band were able to revive their creativity, what gets him pumped up to perform and his goals for 2012.

OS: You had some difficulties with the making of [2009's] Armistice, specifically with songwriting and working with a new producer. What did you learn from that experience and how did it influence your approach to recording this time around?

DK: I learned a little bit about not making things any more difficult than they need to be. I learned, through that process, the most valuable lesson I learned in my career so far. Of course, there are difficulties and parts of it that are frustrating, but you’re not supposed to hate music. You’re not supposed to hate the process. It’s fine if it’s a little arduous, a little frustrating, if you get stuck and get writer’s block…all of that’s good. But there’s always supposed to be this passion in it, it’s not supposed to be just this uphill climb, feat of strength just go get through it. From that point on, I vowed to make it fun. And whenever it gets gross, I start over again, in regards to songwriting, or the process of creating. You’re supposed to feel like you’re cheating at life by getting to do this for a living. And I try to present that, I try to fight for that now, and a big part of that, oddly enough, was not having a producer for this record, and it being just the three of us.

OS: Odd Soul is the first album you’ve made without original guitarist, Greg Hill. How did this change affectyour approach to the new album?

DK: Todd [Gummerman, guitarist] didn’t come into the picture until after the album was finished, so we had all of the guitarists that any band would ever need, and our bass player, Roy [Mitchell-Cárdenas]. [Roy] did a marvelous job of bringing all kinds of creativity and spark to the process to the process. I think he had a lot pent up in him too; he’s a talented guy.

He was a guitar player before he did anything else, so that was an easy transition. He stepped up, too. He’s a father of two, and both he and our lead singer were expecting children during the recording of this album. Roy would drive all the way from Miami to New Orleans, he’d drive through the night, and show up with a great attitude. It was really inspiring. And now we have our new guitarist. As we were finishing our songs in the studio, I would send them to him, and he would tell us that they were fun to play. He worked really hard to get ready for his audition. We were expecting to audition Todd in person, but he got to a place where he knew the songs well enough that he got tired of waiting for us, and he’d just email us his takes. He would play the songs, record himself, sing along, play along and he’d email it to me…and I thought that was ballsy! It made it easy; definitely our first audition via email!

OS: It’s rare to see a drummer that is so involved in the songwriting process. Does Mutemath have a certain method for how you write together?

DK: I think I’m more involved than you even know! Right now, I’m putting together our live video show and it’s time consuming, but I love it. This is probably the first time I’ve mentioned this…we’re doing a very exciting, 3D video show on this next tour. It’s been very tedious, but we’re working with some people in New York and some people in Nashville and we decided to try and go all in on this tour to make it big. So currently, my days are spent programming and animating video for this live show…it’s a new-found interest of mine.

OS: Odd Soul has a more blues-influenced sound than Armistice. What was the cause behind this shift in sound? Were there any particular artists that influenced you while writing this record?

DK: It’s so funny how the influences that I think I’m going for the most, don’t really seem to be the ones that come through in the end product. I’m not sure if that’s a good thing, either. But Roy’s playing opened up a lot of opportunities for us. All we were going for was something that would go great live. All the bluesy-ness didn’t so much come from us saying, “Let’s try to do something a little Jimi Hendrix-y,” or, “Let’s do some Led Zeppelin riffs.” It was really that we didn’t want to make a sleepy album. We didn’t want to make something that would be convoluted, live. We wanted to make something that would allow us to play to our strengths as a live band. The whole idea behind the record was to set up the tour that we’re about to do now. The big tour, with the video show and the lights and all of the antics. After Armistice, we released a live record, and I remember reading a review of it that said something like, “Why is this MuteMath’s best record? Why is their best record this live record?” And I thought, well, it probably makes sense that it is, to them. There’s probably some switch that we turn off when you go into the studio. Music can be a little like taxidermy. You can start replacing the real stuff with the glass eyeball and get real meticulous with making things seem real. And I think it has to be that way, to an extent, whenever you do music in the studio. So we tried to make [Odd Soul] sound more real.

OS: You’ve had your songs featured on the soundtracks for major motion pictures like Twilight and Transformers. How have these placements changed or impacted your fan base?

DK: Don’t forget The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants 2! Yeah, we did get some younger fans through Twilight, and I loved it. We got some hatred through Transformers. Some people loved it, but there were some hardcore Transformers fans that were livid that it wasn’t heavier, like…[metal growl]

OS: Before the new album dropped, Mutemath played some smaller clubs on the Odd Soul Introduction Tour. How will this upcoming tour be different from those shows?

DK: It will be longer. Right now, I’m not making any promises, but right now, the setlist we have has about twenty to twenty-two songs in it. We’ll have a great opening act in our friend Canon Blue, he’s out of Nashville, on Rumraket Records. He’s great. A great musician, great songwriter. We just decided, at this point, not to take out bands that we don’t like, but will sell tickets.

I’d just really rather not subject our fans to that anymore. Actually, we’ve done a pretty good job at taking out artists that I like. But we had a couple opportunities to tour with bands, and we’re gonna go for quality. We do want to make this the most absurd show we can and I want everyone to feel like they got way more than their money’s worth after the show, and I want to make it the best tour we’ve ever done. I’m certainly excited about this 3D video. We’ve got this really neat set behind us, and I think it’s technology that’s going to be pretty common in a year. I’m glad that we’re doing it now…I feel like we’re ahead of the game if we do this tour this way. If we did it next year, someone else will have done it before us.  I know [electronic musician] Amon Tobin has done crazy stuff with projecting on 3D structures…you see it a lot with electronic artists, but I don’t know a band that’s done it yet on a tour. So the goal, unless someone sneaks in there next week, we’ll be the first band to take that kind of stuff on the road.

OS: You mentioned Canon Blue earlier…what can people seeing him for the first time expect from his performance?

DK: He’s an electronic artist. He’s opened for Miike Snow, I think that was a really good fit. So, stylistically, fans of Miike Snow will also enjoy Canon Blue. He’s done a good job with mixing a lot of really beautiful elements with some intense, glitchy electronics, as well. I know he got the Amiina Quartet to play on his record, the same group that played for Sigur Rós. So he’s got a lot of pretty strings on his record, and he’s a good singer too…it’s going to be my favorite tour, I’m pretty positive of it. Unless something goes wrong! [laughs]

OS: You guys are known for having a pretty wild live show. What inspires your stage presence? Do you tendto be more consistent with the performance aspect of the set, or more spontaneous?

DK: I’ll only speak for myself, because I think the other guys would give you a different answer… but I’ll tell you what makes me wild on stage. I’m a little hungry for attention, and you certainly get it whenever you perform. People clap for you after every single song. I can’t think of anything else where I get that much attention. From the very first show we ever did, God, it got me really excited. I’m not an only child, but my brother and sister were both teenagers when I was born, and I was just alone a lot. I would spend hours in my bedroom playing drums, pretending there was an audience in front of me. Or I would put on my Paula Abdul record and dance as a background dancer and pretend there was an audience. I look back and realize that a very large portion of my time alone as a kid was pretending I was in front of a bunch of people.

I’d even do speeches. I memorized the Gettysburg Address and I would do it in my bedroom for, I guess, a bunch of soldiers? I was raised in church, and Paul did this too, he’d preach, his family would make him preach for people…and I would preach to no one in my room. That was just my thing, I guess…pretending I had an audience. And when I finally got one, I think I got way too excited. I just get pumped up. It’s exhilarating. And to be honest with you, I’m addicted to it. Sometimes I play hard because I love it. If I’m tired but I’m still playing hard, it’s because I don’t want it to end. I’m scared of the day when I don’t have an audience in front of me. I don’t like myself when I go too long without playing a show. I’ve gotten a little bit better about it, I think being married helps [laughs]. If one person approves of you after seeing you at your worst, then that does mean more than a bunch of people who think you’re cool whenever you’ve got a bunch of smoke and mirrors. I used to go through intense withdrawal, really bad, whenever we didn’t tour enough [laughs]. So yeah, it’s kind of an addiction thing. I get excited about people, I’m like a dog! [laughs]

OS: Since we just started a new year, what’s something you hope to accomplish this year that you haven’t done yet?

DK: Like my resolutions? My New Year’s resolutions are: to not sit down to pee, because I end up playing Words With Friends on my phone…just sitting on the toilet for too long. It’s just such a waste of time. Being on the toilet for five minutes after you’ve gone to the bathroom is just dumb. I’m also going to stretch daily. As a band, we’ve already made a couple music videos, we want to make another one. We get to go to Australia and we want to make a good impression there. And I want to be a good son, a good sibling, a good husband, a good drummer. OK, here’s the real one: to get into a creative habit with music. When we’re control freaks like this and we’re working on video and working on the tour so much, I’m starting to miss getting to make new songs. So just to do a little bit every day, with songwriting, so it doesn’t take too long to come out with the next record.

This is definitely a show you don’t want to miss! Catch MuteMath’s Odd Soul Tour on these dates:

01/26 Houston, TX at House of Blues
01/27 Austin, TX at Stubb’s
01/28 Dallas, TX at House of Blues
01/29 Tulsa, OK at Cain’s Ballroom
01/31 Denver, CO at Gothic Theatre
02/02 Los Angeles, CA at Club Nokia Live
02/03 San Diego, CA at 4th and B Concert Theater
02/07 San Francisco, CA at The Regency Ballroom
02/08 Sacramento, CA at Ace of Spades
02/10 Seattle, WA at Showbox SoDo
02/11 Spokane, WA at Knitting Factory
02/12 Boise, ID at Knitting Factory
02/14 Salt Lake City, UT at Club Sound
02/16 Kansas City, MO at Beaumont Club
02/17 Chicago, IL at House of Blues
02/18 Minneapolis, MN at First Avenue
02/28 St. Louis, MO at The Pageant
03/01 Grand Rapids, MI at The Intersection
03/02 Detroit, MI at St. Andrew’s Hall
03/03 Columbus, OH at Newport Music Hall
03/04 Cleveland, OH at House of Blues
03/07 Boston, MA at House of Blues
03/08 New York, NY at Best Buy Theater
03/09 Philadelphia, PA at Trocadero
03/10 Washington D.C. at 9:30 Club
03/11 Norfolk, VA at The Norva
03/14 Charlotte, NC at Amos’ Southend
03/16 Ft. Lauderdale, FL at Revolution
03/17 Orlando, FL at House of Blues
03/18 Atlanta, GA at The Tabernacle

Riffs, Rants & Rumors: Joe Henry’s Rumbling, Rattling ‘Reverie’

Joe Henry has been exploring the relationship between songs and their aural atmosphere for a quarter of a century. His early albums cloaked his carefully crafted compositions in a variety of artful atmospheres provided by other producers, like T-Bone Burnett and Anton Fier, but he began to hit his stride in the early ‘90s, when he took the production reigns himself on a pair of albums—Short Man’s Room and Kindness of the World—that found him backed by alt-country heroes The Jayhawks. With 1996’s Fuse, Henry began pursuing an increasingly unconventional production muse, employing everything from ambient synthesizer textures to the saxophone of Ornette Coleman (the jazz giant plays on 2001’s “Richard Pryor Addresses a Tearful Nation”). With each album from Fuse up through 2009’s Blood From Stars, Henry’s production became increasingly more impressionistic, but his latest, Reverie, marks a reversal of that direction.

It should be noted, of course, that Henry has also spent the last several years as a producer for others, helming projects for a wide spectrum of artists that runs from the late, great soul man Solomon Burke to New Orleans legend Allen Toussaint. During that time, he’s had the opportunity to investigate all manner of American roots styles, which may have affected his decision to make Reverie an organic, all-acoustic, live-in-the-studio affair. Certainly Henry’s work on The River In Reverse, the collaboration Toussaint cut in the Crescent City in 2005 with Elvis Costello, had an effect on him. “We worked really, really hard on that record,” Henry recalls, “it was an incredibly intense, brief period of time. We all felt honored to be there, especially given what had just happened in New Orleans. We were all freshly awakened to how important the music of that city has been. And here’s Allen, the living patriarch of that music—to be in service to him in that moment felt like a tremendous gift.”

Continue reading ‘Riffs, Rants & Rumors: Joe Henry’s Rumbling, Rattling ‘Reverie’’

“Coldest” MC PyInfamous Rocks The Mic At ESSENCE® Music Fest

PyInfamous — The nation’s “Coldest” MC, Grand Prize winner of the “Coors Light Search for The Coldest” Competition — recently rocked the mic at ESSENCE® Music Festival in New Orleans, LA.

While he was there, Py got the opportunity to do what he does best—represent the South, his home state of Mississippi and “dope hip hop music” in front of a crowd of fans and celebs alike. Combine that all with a little face time with hip hop’s elite, and you’ve got one hell of a Grand Prize experience.

We couldn’t resist the urge to hit up Py for more details, so we recently caught up with him to get the low down on how things went and more.

Aside from wowing OurStage fans and Coors judges alike, what exactly makes PyInfamous “The Coldest” MC? We’ll leave that explanation to the man himself:

“I think the fact that I keep my music true to my reality and the reality that a lot of people are facing. That’s what a lot of music lacks. By combining substance with skill, I think I’ve been able to touch a certain part of people that a lot of the hip hop that is made now misses.”

Throughout the final phase of the competition, it became obvious that Py’s lyrical skills weren’t the only thing helping him rack up votes. The MC promoted the final voting phase relentlessly and creatively—filming skits, drawing comics and more. We asked him about his promotional master plan:

“What we tried to do was develop some innovative, nontraditional methods to engage fans. We wanted to use social media but in a different manner, and the ultimate goal—and one I think we achieved—was to turn the contest over to the fans who then felt they had the power to pull out a win for hip hop, for the South and for the state of Mississippi.”

At the core of these efforts was the drive to land a performance at ESSENCE® Music Festival in New Orleans, an experience that placed PyInfamous in front of festival crowds. His verdict: Continue reading ‘“Coldest” MC PyInfamous Rocks The Mic At ESSENCE® Music Fest’

PyInfamous Takes The Title Of The “Coldest” MC In The Nation!

Thousands entered, four were selected, one prevailed.

In March, Coors Light and OurStage threw down the gauntlet for hip-hoppers nationwide to step up and claim the title of the nation’s “Coldest” MC. To say that Mississippi native PyInfamous simply “stepped up” would be doing him a disservice.

Py submitted his song “Bliss (Cooler Than This)” in the Coors Light “Search For the Coldest” Competition South Channel and was selected as a finalist by the competition judges, including DJ Khaled, PacDiv and Bryan Michael Cox. The footage of his energetic opening performance for N.E.R.D. and PacDiv along with his relentless promotion helped him rack up over 45% of the votes in the final round to secure the title of “Coldest” MC!

PyInfamous will perform on July 2nd in New Orleans during ESSENCE® Music Festival weekend and grab $10,000 in studio time. Stay tuned to the OurStage Magazine for our interview with PyInfamous and stop by his OurStage profile to show him some love. Check out his winning performance in Atlanta below!

 


Exclusive Interviews
Featured Artists
OurStage Updates
News
Features
Reviews and Playlists
Editors Pick

 

 




 

iAnEAqqqq