Changes to the monthly competitions

Hi and welcome back to Amazing OurStage. We want to let you know that there will be changes to the prizes we are offering. Every month will be different.
This month we are awarding prizes of $100 to winners of the competition finals. In the future there will be prizes to help your musical career. Check back to find out.

OurStage is now part of Amazing Media

Come back to see the improvements to OurStage over the next few months.

Visit
Amazingtunes-logo
to upload music …
Amazing-radio-logo
to listen to it.
Amazing-instore-logo
For instore music solutions
Tag: mick jagger
amazing icon

Video Playback Error

The Adobe Flash Player is required to watch videos on this page

Tag: "mick jagger"

home buzz rock pop urban country

Lana Del Rey Stole Half An Hour Of My Life And I Will Never Get It Back

Lana Del ReyI really tried to give Lana Del Rey the benefit of the doubt on this one. I swear. I was hoping that her half-hour long short film Tropico, “an epic tale based on the biblical story of sin and redemption,” wasn’t going to be another poorly–conceived attempt at grand symbolism and “deep” meaning that would inevitably force me to question why I ever derived any satisfaction from her music in the first place and would once again make me come face to face with the full scope of her guileless superficiality and lack of insight. But you know what Mick Jagger says.

So, just for the sake of convenience, even though the biblical triptych of innocence, sin, and redemption is the central conceit of the video, I’m going to ignore the overwrought and overused religious parallels that Lana cuts and pastes with bowling ball-level subtlety and focus more on her decision to include voiceovers of her reading excerpts from Walt Whitman and Allen Ginsberg poems, which is exactly as pretentious as it sounds.
Continue reading ‘Lana Del Rey Stole Half An Hour Of My Life And I Will Never Get It Back’

“Crossfire Hurricane” Tour Doc To Shine A New Light On The Rolling Stones

Storied british rock band The Rolling Stones announced a new band doc, Crossfire Hurricane, earlier today. The tour doc, commemorating the 50th anniversary of The Stones as a performing unit, marks another authorized entry into the already deep documentary videography that The Stones have amassed over the years. Classic rock nerds will also note that the film pulls its title from a lyric in “Jumpin Jack Flash.”

Crossfire Hurricane appears to be pretty broad in focus, covering the trajectory of the group from their earliest touring days in 1962 to the band as we know them as today.

Continue reading ‘“Crossfire Hurricane” Tour Doc To Shine A New Light On The Rolling Stones’

Kind Of A Drag

Today is kind of a slow news day. And so, today, you get… rock stars in drag: the superlatives.

Most natural: Bowie

Most disturbing: Queen

Most frequent: Mick Jagger and The Rolling Stones

Best homage: Blur (as Blondie)

Most dudes: Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention

Best pout: Ozzy Osbourne

Most confusing to high school jocks in 1994: Kurt Cobain

Most committed: New York Dolls

Best looking: Bono

President Obama Sings The Blues

While having musical talent is certainly not a prerequisite for being President of the United States, it definitely makes you way cooler, in our book. The White House has been absent of musical talent since Clinton was rocking out sax solos on the Arsenio Hall Show. But fret no more, music lovers: turns out our Commander In Chief has a set of pipes! Last week, President Obama surprised a Harlem audience by singing the hook to the famous Al Green tune “Let’s Stay Together” at a fundraiser at the Apollo Theater. Yesterday, he showcased some more of his talent by joining B.B. King, Mick Jagger and Buddy Guy for a few lines of his hometown anthem, “Sweet Home Chicago.”

Obama had hosted a night of performances dedicated to the blues, featuring musicians Jeff Beck, Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews, Gary Clark Jr., Warren Haynes, Derek Trucks, and Booker T. Jones. President Obama was encouraged to sing by Buddy Guy, who told the President, “You started something, you got to keep it up,” referring to his Al Green impersonation. Obama joined the all-star cast, singing “come on, baby don’t you wanna go,” then having B.B. King chime in with “same old place.” Obama took the mic back and finished out the song with “sweet home, Chicago” before flashing the camera his signature smile and exiting the East Room to cheerful applause.

You can check out the full coverage of the event here.

Sound And Vision: Strange Bedfellows — The Best of Music’s Unlikely Collaborations

“I get high with a little help from my friends,” Ringo Starr sang on the Beatles‘ 1967 classic. These days, so do many of music’s top stars. Two’s company, and so is three and sometimes four. The more the merrier, the higher and higher they get.

On the charts, that is.

In the Top 40 of Billboard’s Hot 100 for the week ending December 10, seventeen songs were collaborations between separate recording entities. Four of them featured Drake, and three apiece featured Rihanna and Nicki Minaj, who both appeared on tracks with Drake and with each other. But will.i.am featuring Jennifer Lopez and Mick Jagger—and debuting at No. 36 with “T.H.E. (The Hardest Ever),” which the threesome performed on the November 20 American Music Awards—was probably the one that nobody saw coming.

Old-school Rolling Stones fans must be cringing at the idea of Jagger going anywhere near Lopez and will.i.am so soon after Maroon 5 featuring Christina Aguilera went to No. 1 by invoking his hallowed name on “Moves Like Jagger.” But for a sixty-something legend like him, hit records—even if in name only, a la Duck Sauce‘s GRAMMY-nominated “Barbra Streisand—are a near-impossible dream unless they’re in tandem with other, often younger, stars.

Continue reading ‘Sound And Vision: Strange Bedfellows — The Best of Music’s Unlikely Collaborations’

Vocal Points: Singers and their Accents

Every singing voice is unique. After all, that’s what makes vocalists special, and what makes music so interesting. But besides tonal quality, range and timbre, there is another factor that sometimes contributes to a singer’s sound—his or her accent. For some singers, accent doesn’t play a huge role in their music, but for others, it is a defining factor.

The Beatles Liverpudlian accent is, in my opinion, a defining factor in their music. It is very apparent in many of their songs, and is one of many factors that makes the band great. For example, the way that customer is pronounced in “Penny Lane” stands out, as well as countless other examples throughout their catalog of music. Still, it’s hard to know where exactly certain artists come from.

There are so many examples of British singers who sound as if they could easily be from the US. Elton John, Amy Winehouse and even Adele have been known to shed their British accents in song. And then there’s a band like Phoenix, who you’d never suspect comes from France. And this makes sense if you think about it. A regional accent is made up of differences in features like intonation, speech rhythm, vowel length and vowel quality, all of which naturally disappear in song. Intonation is replaced by the melody which the vocalist sings, typical speech rhythm changes based on timing and rhythm of the song, and vowel length and quality are oftentimes elongated and enunciated when sung. Continue reading ‘Vocal Points: Singers and their Accents’

 


Exclusive Interviews
Featured Artists
OurStage Updates
News
Features
Reviews and Playlists
Editors Pick

 

 




 

iAnEAqqqq