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Keith Buckley Of Every Time I Die Fronting 90′s Alternative Cover Band

It may sound like a joke (and perhaps it was at first), but this is no lie. Keith Buckley, frontman for hardcore metal band Everytime I Die, and friends have started a new band called Soul Patch, self-described as “Buffalo’s Premier 90′s Alternative Cover Band.” Head to their facebook page and vote for what 90′s alternative/grunge songs they should cover! If you’re in the Buffalo/NY state area, be sure to catch their next gig!

 

More Like This:

What Makes A Great Cover Song?

We hear cover songs all the time. Entire bands exist for the sole purpose of covering the work of another artist or group. Big name musicians perform the music of their fellow artists all the time to pay tribute to the ones who inspired them. And more recently, we’ve seen up-and-coming singers become famous from posting their cover songs on YouTube. Fourteen-year-old Greyson Chance, who has already released his debut album, got his big break from covering Lady Gaga‘s “Paparazzi” at a school event. OurStage’s duo Karmin has received over 40 million views on one of their captivating and unique hip hop covers. Just a couple of weeks ago, they performed at the iHeartRadio festival among artists such as Lady Gaga and Jay-Z. But with so many people recording and performing cover songs, we have to wonder “what makes the good ones stand out?” We’ve found some of our favorite from the Cover Bands Channel to show you!

Karmin

 

Take, for example, the talented a cappella group called Rockapella, who covered Vampire Weekend‘s hit “A Punk”. The group took a song that is upbeat, fast-paced and performed by a full band, and recreated it with just their voices. Their version is slowed down and focuses on the harmonies created by the members of the group. It sounds more soulful and catches your attention right from the start.

Even Better Than The Real Thing, Baby: Tribute Bands for the Irony Age

Once the domain of super-serious, straight-up cover bands like Sticky Fingers (The Stones), Crystal Ship (The Doors) and the thousands of Beatles covers bands who flourished after the Broadway musical Beatlemania made it cool to be faux, the world of tribute bands has evolved along with every other musical movement. From the weird and marginal (Mini Kiss, a band of little people who lip sync to Kiss recordings) to the ultra professional (Bjorn Again ,the highly successful traveling fake-Abba stage show), tribute bands are multiplying and diversifying.

In the post-millennial, post-irony era, it is difficult to enjoy even our “guilty pleasures” without some conceptual tweaking that allows us to feel that we are in on the joke. So while the more serious tribute bands continue to rake in literally millions of dollars per year from ticket sales, a whole crop of acts have emerged that combine off-kilter performance art with sing-a-long élan.

Tragedy, The Bee Gees Tribute band http://www.letsmaketragedyhappen.com/

One popular trend in this direction is the stylistic mashuplike New York City’s Tragedy, who play heavy metal versions of Bee Gees songs; Beatallica, a seamless blend of thrash metal and Fab Four pop; Hoboken’s Skanatra, who apply a spirited blue-beat to the Ol’ Blue Eyes repertoire; and Hayseed Dixie, whose bluegrass renditions of hard rock classicsand elaborate fictional backstoryhave kept audiences chuckling for over a decade.

An offshoot of the hybrid tribute act is the gender switche.g. Hell’s Belles (femme AC/DC), Deva (double-X chromosome Devo tribute), Lez Zeppelin (“All girls, all Zeppelin”), We Got the Meat, (Portland’s all-male Go-Go’s) and The Pretty Babies, the all-girl Blondie tribute band led by New York singer/comedienne Tammy Faye Starlite, who was an actress before she turned to musical comedy.

“I like to play characters,” says Starlite, who also plays Mick Jagger in the hilarious all-female Rolling Stones act, The Mike Hunt Band. “I guess I’d call myself a ‘performer’like Liza, but less sequined. And unfortunately, with fewer opiates.”

Inhabiting the persona of Debbie Harry, Nico or Mick “is like doing a great play. The singer is the lead character, and the songs are the lines.”

Bambi Kino Photo Credit: Andrew Bicknell

Then there are the less theatrical but still high-concept acts. Former Guided By Voices member Doug Gillard (now mainly a solo artist) has recently begun playing in Bambi Kino, a Beatles tribute with a twist: their song selections and playing style directly copy the early-‘60s, Hamburg-nightclub-playing era of the band, during which their set lists were mainly pop covers and a few primitive originals. Although the group, which includes Nada Surf’s Ira Elliot, doesn’t assume fake Beatles identities, they do aim for sonic authenticity.

Says Gillard, “We try to avoid more modern guitar chord voicings, licks, and drum fills in favor of period-appropriate styleswhich is a challenge. There’s an appeal for us in really inhabiting the music and the era we’re playing songs from.”

Aside from the artistic challenge, and the potential to make some money, what motivates tribute artists to do their thing? Singer Cathy Cervenka heads up the New York-based Cathyland rock collective, which puts together tribute shows for their favorite ‘80s artists, demonstrating both great devotion and dashes of amiable camp. A recent gig had Cervenka performing, with gusto and supple vocal skill, Pat Benatar’s breakthrough Crimes of Passion album with a strong backing band in full ‘80s spandex array.

“There’s nothing more fun than getting to play your favorite songs onstage with your band,” says Cervenka, “for an audience of fellow fans, who know every word and guitar lick of every song.”

She adds reverentially, “It’s a very communal experience.”

By Paula Carino

Paula Carino is a musician and writer based in New York. She’s written for AMG, American Songwriter and contributed to the Encyclopedia of Pop Music. She’s also a yoga teacher and authored the book Yoga To Go.

 


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